Physical illness brings a lot of resting and sitting around. That’s more of a change for some than others, but it’s needed. Your friends and family understand and sincerely want to help. They have a story or know a story; something that helped them or another friend to navigate a major life challenge. They give you a book (or send you a song)! With anything like this hand-selected for you, the entire work is colored by the relationship and life of the giver. Well, for me it is.

A rather large stack of such books sits behind “my” chair in our living room.

This is great when you love to read and have the time. For years I’ve kept an informal reading cycle, three broad categories of something spiritual/devotional, something for health/wellness and professional development, and something fun, usually fiction. I’ve read approximately 3/4ths of the books given to me. Of those, I have learned something from all of them, and have enjoyed a little over half of them. Please don’t feel bad about that. The truly surprising and odd thing would be to report that I completely resonated with each and every one.

The difficult thing about this scenario is that the books are not all in agreement. Some commonalities and consistencies exist within any topic, but differ in many important details. Books about the best way to deal with cancer are especially contradictory. Unlike individual articles or social media posts, books provide plenty of context and explanation of the author’s journey and thought process. Because of that, this “worst thing” is also the best thing. It’s where true learning and better understanding happen! So thank you, and keep them coming.

Although I’d like to claim otherwise, it’s still impossible NOT to initially judge a book by it’s cover. There are books that I -wanted to like- based on the cover and person giving it, but did not. There are others that I initially -wanted to dislike-, but loved. For example, The Life Changing Science of Spontaneous Healing (by Dr. Jeff Rediger) is a bit mistitled because it actually gives many helpful, practical insight and fairly thorough understanding of the critical principles behind many systemic health problems. One friend had the audacity to hand me a book with a cover and title boldly proclaiming that our bodies are but a placebo and it’s only our beliefs that hold us back. Imagine reading that cover, having recently, fairly suddenly been nearly glued to a recliner, riddled with tumors and toxic medicines rendering you a fatigued and nauseous lump. But I know this long-term friend. There is a history, and I trust his heart. Because of that I forced the book open a crack, learned a few things, and largely enjoyed it!

Lastly are the books that I did not want to like and very much did not like. How to Starve Cancer (Jane McClelland) was not given to me, but was highly recommended by more than a few friends who have dealt with or are currently dealing with cancer. This one appears to be currently popular among this population. Explaining a few specifics should shed light on the general picture of what we’re all dealing with in so many health and wellness topics.

-Jane is far more of an entrepreneur than any kind of doctor or scientist. To me, this is obvious not only from her bio on the back cover, but also by her writing voice.  I’m not sure “The award-winning creator of Bathrobics toiletries” is the most reliable and trustworthy source for such a complex and pervasive of a topic. Cancer is absolutely…emotional. Jane knows how to get a lot of mileage from that.

-Jane makes the assumption that her rather horrific and traumatic experience in the UK healthcare system is the rule for all patients. To deny or invalidate her experience would be wrong. Indeed, the system is far from perfect. But readers should be reminded that everything that she writes about mainstream medical systems and treatments are tainted by her personal trauma (and two or three burnt out, plain uncaring, and likely overworked oncologists). My personal experience so far is quite the opposite.

-The foundation of Jane’s work and recommendations sound quite scientific. I have no doubt that a large portion of it is rooted in -some- -good- science. But so many of her assumptions are, well, false. I declare “Fake News,” haha. The concept of “starving” cancer through diet or otherwise is highly misleading. While scientists at colleges and universities around the world say this and attempt to use various methods, from a wide variety of angles, to hone in on very specific answers to specific problems, Jane seems to think that she has arrived at better, clear-cut pathways as a one-person revolutionary. Though possible, it’s highly unlikely. Jane describes so many supplements, conventional and unconventional medicines, lifestyle changes, and other treatments that who really knows what treatment is doing what, for what!

Real science knows better, discovers differently, and has to ferret out complex details over a large variety of individuals. Or in other words, throwing a bunch of crap against the wall and seeing what sticks is different than real science.

-The entire “Why?” of the book is based on a great conspiracy. Pharmaceutical companies, colleges and universities, and almost all cancer centers and the doctors have all conspired to the benefit of pharmaceutical companies AND cancer foundations. Being reminded about the exact same problems of “Big Pharma” every three pages becomes tiresome. Using old and relatively safe drugs in new “off label” ways is not Jane’s unconventional idea, but is indeed a conventional treatment and area of study at legitimate research institutes.

-The companies that sink nearly incomprehensible amounts of money and manpower into developing and then approving an effective and safe drug will almost certainly charge a significant amount of money per dose. No conspiracy needed. That is how the system currently works, for better and for worse.

-Just because a cheaper drug or other treatment does not pay “Big Pharma” does not mean that it’s not highly valuable and sought after. Many groups and individual have great personal interest in using anything at our disposal to solve this riddle. A prime example are the insurance companies! A friend who is a distinguished PhD and cancer researcher at the University of Buffalo recently advised me that “It’s important for you to remain comfortable, warm…don’t let yourself get cold for long.” This is scientific, literally based off her team’s fascinating research in mice and humans, looking deep into various stress-induced responses of cancer stem cells. Pharmaceutical companies do not benefit one ounce from this cutting edge “treatment.”

-Lastly, Jane’s tone is highly authoritative, without real credentials, and to the point of being prideful. There is nearly zero humility in her laments or criticisms, much less her victories. Maybe it’s just me and my own pride issue. To some people, her sort of tone may demand respect and confidence. But I’m not impressed by it.

Let the reader beware…even right now ; ) . As always, thanks for taking the time to read my journey and thoughts. I hope and pray that you learn something. Keep reading, and growing!

 

 

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